We stayed at the Hotel Evi Apartments for a week at the end of October 2003. It was the last week of the season, so Faliraki was fairly quiet. All of the late-night clubs on Club Street had closed down, as had most of the drinks-only bars on Bar Street. The tavernas, restaurants and shops were still open though!

The apartments at the Evi were clean and modern, with full individual air conditioning. Maids changed the bedding and towels every day, and emptied the rubbish. Catering facilities were fairly basic (a fridge, two hotplates and a sink), but we had planned on eating out most of the time. We tried a few of the nearby tavernas, and soon settled on one called the ‘Nectar Taverna’ on the main Rhodes-Lindos road. Service was good, and the food fantastic (in quality and quantity) compared with the restaurants nearer the centre. There were several ‘corner shop’ supermarkets nearby – Morrisons, Asda, Safeway and Sainsburys! Food selection in the shops was a bit limited; spirits were fairly cheap.

The hotel was at the southern end of Faliraki, quite close to the main Rhodes-Lindos road. Faliraki centre (and the beach) was only about 10-15 minutes walk away from the hotel.

Photos around Faliraki and the Hotel

Charlotte in the hotel pool
Charlotte in the hotel pool

Greek Orthodox Church in Faliraki
Greek Orthodox Church in Faliraki

Faliraki Harbour
Faliraki Harbour

Faliraki Beach
Faliraki Beach

Bar Street, Faliraki
Bar Street, Faliraki

Nektar Taverna, Faliraki
Nektar Taverna, Faliraki

28th October Ochi Day Parade, Rhodes Old Town

On the Tuesday we took the local bus into Rhodes town; the fare was only 1.60€ for a journey of about 20 minutes. The bus station is near the Mandraki harbour just outside the city walls of the old mediaeval town. We arrived at about 10am, in time to see the Ochi day parade. A seemingly endless line of schoolchildren marched past, followed by the police, fire brigade, mounted police and several hundred troops.

Ochi Day, Rhodes Old Town
Ochi Day, Rhodes Old Town

Ochi Day, Rhodes Old Town
Ochi Day, Rhodes Old Town

Ochi Day, Rhodes Old Town
Ochi Day, Rhodes Old Town

Ochi Day, Rhodes Old Town
Ochi Day, Rhodes Old Town

28th October – Ochi day . On this day in 1940 the Greek Government defied Mussolini’s ultimatum demanding capitulation .Because of this historic “no” the day is called “Ochi day” and is celebrated with school and military parades in towns and villages throughout Greece.

The Archaeological Museum, Rhodes town

The Rhodes Archaeological Museum is housed in the mediaeval Hospital of the Knights, which can be found just inside the city gates from the harbour at the bottom of ‘Ipoton’, the Street of the Knights. Admission is free, and these snapshots of the central courtyard really don’t do it justice. There are plenty of side-rooms and corridors to explore, with some impressive collections of statues and ancient greek pottery. Replicas of the statues and pottery are widely available in the souvenir shops around Rhodes.

Archaeological Museum, Rhodes
Archaeological Museum, Rhodes

Archaeological Museum, Rhodes
Archaeological Museum, Rhodes

Archaeological Museum, Rhodes
Archaeological Museum, Rhodes

Archaeological Museum, Rhodes
Archaeological Museum, Rhodes

From the Archaeological Museum, you can walk up the Street of the Knights (‘Ipoton’) to the Palace of the Grand Master (or ‘Kastelo’). From the Kastelo, Orfeos Street leads south to the start of Socrates Street.

Street of the Knights, Rhodes
Street of the Knights, Rhodes

Palace of the Grand Master, Rhodes
Palace of the Grand Master, Rhodes

Orfeos Street, Rhodes
Orfeos Street, Rhodes

Orfeos Street, Rhodes
Orfeos Street, Rhodes

Shopping on Socrates Street, Rhodes Old Town

This long street is the heart of the old town’s commercial district, packed with busy shops and little side streets. It runs east down the hill for almost the entire breadth of the town, until it enters Ipokratous Square near the harbour city wall.

Socrates Street, Rhodes
Socrates Street, Rhodes

Byzantine icons shop, Socrates Street
Byzantine icons shop, Socrates Street

Socrates Street, Rhodes
Socrates Street, Rhodes

Socrates Street, Rhodes
Socrates Street, Rhodes

From Ipokratous Square, Aristotelous Street leads a short distance to the Square of the Jewish Martyrs with its memorial to the dead of WW2.

A Shop on Aristotelous Street, Rhodes
A Shop on Aristotelous Street, Rhodes

Square of the Jewish Martyrs, Rhodes
Square of the Jewish Martyrs, Rhodes

Ipokratous Square, Rhodes Old Town

Ipokratous Square at the bottom of Socrates Street is lined with pavement cafes and restaurants. When we were there, all of the restaurant owners were busily touting for trade from the tourists. We returned to the old town one evening later in the week, and tried one of the restaurants. Service wasn’t anything special, despite the place being fairly quiet, and the food wasn’t as good as the tavernas in Faliraki. The bill however was nearly double what we were used to paying! Perhaps they can get away with it because of the fabulous location. A walk through the old town after dark is a real treat, with some of the most important buildings lit by floodlights.

Ippocratous Square, Rhodes
Ippocratous Square, Rhodes

Ippocratous Square, Rhodes
Ippocratous Square, Rhodes

Ippocratous Square, Rhodes
Ippocratous Square, Rhodes

Ippocratous Square, Rhodes
Ippocratous Square, Rhodes

The Acropolis at Lindos

Lindos narrow streets
Lindos narrow streets

Below the Acropolis, Lindos
Below the Acropolis, Lindos

Greek Trireme carved in rock, Lindos
Greek Trireme carved in rock, Lindos

Steps to the Acropolis, Lindos
Steps to the Acropolis, Lindos

On Thursday we took the local bus South to Lindos. It’s a bit further than the journey to Rhodes town – probably the best part of an hour on the bus. The bus drops you off at the main car park above the village. From there, it’s a ten minute walk down a steep hill to the village. Local taxi’s and buses run a shuttle service up and down the hill. The Acropolis is a 15 minute climb out of the other side of the village (or you can take a donkey ride!). Admission tickets for the Acropolis were 6€ each for adults; children go free. There was quite a lot of restoration work going on while we were there – it looks as though they’re trying to rebuild significant parts of the Acropolis, incorporating the original remains where they can. (Admission ticket 6€ for adults, free for children)

lindos bay from acropolis
Lindos Bay from the Acropolis

acropolis, lindos
View of Lindos Acropolis
rh 092 acropolis, lindosView of the Acropolis rh 093 byzantine church, lindos acropolisByzantine Church at the Acropolis
rh 094 view from acropolis, lindosView from the Acropolis rh 096 acropolis, lindosView of the Acropolis

Mandraki Harbour, Rhodes Town

On Friday we went back to Rhodes town for a last bit of sightseeing and souvenir shopping. We explored the Mandraki harbour as far as the cathedral, and the entrance to the harbour (reputedly the site of the Colossus of Rhodes, one of the seven wonders of the ancient world).

rh 100b mandraki harbour, rhodes rh 098 hydrofoil ambulance, mandraki harbour rhodes
rh 099 mandraki harbour, rhodes rh 105a rhodes harbour

The last day – everything closing down
By the time the end of the week came around, the resort had already begun closing down for the season. Friday 31st October seemed to be the point of no return; when we looked around the resort on the Saturday morning it was like a ghost town. I was half expecting the tumbleweed to roll down the street! All of the shutters were down on bar street and club street, and the shops were busy stocktaking and packing everything into boxes. We arranged to keep our room until the evening because of the late return flight time, so we could enjoy lounging around in the last of the sun by the hotel swimming pool. An early meal at the taverna, followed by a few hours sleep before our coach pickup.

rh 109 near faliraki beachFaliraki centre near the beach rh 077 whats on in falirakiWhat’s on in Faliraki?
rh 108 faliraki is shutBar Street, Faliraki rh 112 faliraki beachFaliraki beach

Some useful links I found…

Evi Hotel – Webtourists One of several web pages I found for the hotel.

Rhodosinfo.com A site in English and dutch, with this map of Faliraki and this map of the island